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Professional course

Dissertation in Psychology

45 credit Master's level module

About this course

Course code:
USPJW945M
Applications:
University
Level:
Professional/Short Course
Department:
Health and Social Sciences
Campus:
Frenchay
Course director:
Victoria Clarke

Page last updated 12 April 2017

Introduction

On successful completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Carry out a critical literature review in a chosen area of psychology, appropriate to programme undertaken (i.e. MSc in Health Psychology students must undertake research within Health Psychology);
  • Identify and locate a research question within that area; select and defend approach to the research question;
  • Design a research study;
  • Plan and execute a piece of independent research;
  • Analyse and interpret the data collected and defend both the analysis and the interpretation;
  • Critically locate the research findings in relation to published work;
  • Produce a written report of the research demonstrating an in depth understanding of the chosen area of study;
  • Engage appropriately with supervision, demonstrating an ability to present ideas and respond appropriately to feedback.

Entry requirements

For those undertaking the MSc in Health Psychology, MSc in Sports and Exercise Psychology, MSc in Psychological Therapies (CBT), MSc in Psychological Therapies (Relational Psychotherapy) at least a lower second class Honours degree or international equivalent in a relevant discipline.

Careers / Further study

This module can contribute towards:

  • MSc Health Psychology
  • MSc Sports and Exercise Psychology
  • MSc Psychological Therapies (CBT)
  • MSc Psychological Therapies (Relational Psychotherapy)
  • MSc Occupational Psychology

Structure

Content

  • Specialist area of study within psychology selected by the student with the advice of a supervisor with expertise in psychological research methods and/or health research, sports and exercise research, or counselling/psychotherapy research dependent upon programme registered for;
  • Research methods advice appropriate to the selected area of study;
  • Understanding and adhering to relevant ethical codes of conduct;
  • Understanding and adhering to best practice for communicating research.

Learning and Teaching

You will be expected to attend around 8 hours of dissertation workshops, and spend around one day per week completing your research and dissertation portfolio.

Scheduled learning: You will be allocated a dissertation supervisor. Supervision will be on an individual basis. A programme of regular supervision sessions (minimum of eight) will be planned with you. Once the research question and protocol are established a research timetable will be agreed with you.

A programme of dissertation workshops will be offered in particular aspects of the research process, including applying for University Ethics approval, approaches, data analysis and research communication, as appropriate.

Independent learning: You will be expected to carry out a literature review in your chosen research area, to read widely in this area, to plan and design an appropriate research project, to obtain ethical approval for your research, to undertake your research (in keeping with relevant ethical codes of conduct) and to communicate your research in the form of a presentation and a written dissertation.

Assessment

Dissertation portfolio including a 6-8,000 word report of an original piece of research (word count excludes reference list and appendices).

Prices and dates

Supplementary fee information

Please visit full fee information to see the price brackets for our modules.

Dates

Please see our timetable for full date information 

How to apply

How to apply

You will apply online for your CPD modules, which you can take as stand-alone courses or as part of an undergraduate or postgraduate (Masters level) programme.

Our how to apply page can assist you with further information prior to submitting your online application. 

For further information

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