BSc(Hons)

Integrated Wildlife Conservation (Top Up)

This course is open for applications.

About this course

Entry year:
2020/21
Course code:
F75A
Applications:
UCAS
Level:
Undergraduate
Department:
Applied Sciences
Campus:
Frenchay
Duration:
One year
Delivery:
Full-time; part-time by negotiation.
Programme leader:
Dr Ian Wilson
Key fact:
Delivered at Bristol Zoo, this one-year top-up course enables FdSc Integrated Wildlife Conservation graduates to upgrade to a three-year BSc degree.

Page last updated 8 January 2020

Introduction

Why study Integrated Wildlife Conservation?

Conserving biodiversity and avoiding the mass extinction of species are huge global challenges. We need wildlife conservationists who can use their skills and scientific knowledge to help tackle these issues and explore new approaches to conserving wildlife. By looking at the nature of global biodiversity, and the effects of habitat loss and climate change, you can equip yourself with the knowledge and tools you need to make a difference in this field.

Why UWE Bristol?

BSc(Hons) Integrated Wildlife Conservation one year top-up has been designed to provide an opportunity for those who have already completed a foundation degree in wildlife conservation to top up to a full BSc (Hons) degree. In particular, it provides a progression route for graduates of the FdSc Integrated Wildlife Conservation degree, which is taught at Bristol Zoo gardens, and gives you unique access to the zoo's facilities and expertise.

The degree explores wildlife conservation issues at local, national and global levels, mixing theory with practice. You'll delve into the relationship between wildlife and society, and consider the impact of human activities on the living world. By exploring the steps that can be taken to alleviate biodiversity decline, you'll gain the skills you need for a career in conservation.

Where can it take me?

You'll be well prepared to go into a wide range of jobs. You could work in national and international wildlife conservation, conservation consultancy, media and wildlife filmmaking, conservation campaigning, wildlife and enterprise, or wildlife conservation research. As a science graduate, your skills will be highly valued and you could go into a range of non-science graduate positions.

Structure

Content

The optional modules listed are those that are most likely to be available, but they may be subject to change.

You will study:

  • Research Project
  • Dissertation Project.

These projects can be tailored to a wildlife conservation topic of your choice.

You will study optional modules from (the number depending on credit requirements): 

  • Contemporary Conservation Science
  • Science Communication
  • Marine Ecosystems
  • Remote Sensing & GIS
  • Tropical Expedition
  • Wildlife, Film & Media
  • Primate Ecology & Conservation
  • Resource Security & Sustainability
  • Scientific Frontiers & Enterprise
  • Environmental Forensics
  • Wildlife Forensics and Conservation.

The University continually enhances our offer by responding to feedback from our students and other stakeholders, ensuring the curriculum is kept up to date and our graduates are equipped with the knowledge and skills they need for the real world. This may result in changes to the course. If changes to your course are approved, we will inform you.

Learning and Teaching

The course offers a wide-ranging curriculum taught through lectures, seminars and tutorials, and complemented by laboratory investigations, case studies, workshops, and fieldwork.

Learn about the research methods, field surveys, data analysis and interpretation, essential to the scientific study of wildlife. Use our advanced filmmaking equipment and expertise to produce your own conservation film.

Put theory into practice through regular field work. As well as fieldwork making the most of the rich range of ecosystems surrounding Bristol, there's an optional expedition to Cuba or Madagascar, or you can explore marine ecosystems with a residential trip to Cornwall.

Watch Richard, Chris and Emiko's stories of their trip to Cuba here.

Receive one-to-one guidance and feedback throughout from our experienced academic and personal tutors.

See our full glossary of learning and teaching terms.

Assessment

We use different assessment methods to support different learning styles, and the wide range of concepts, knowledge and skills we want you to develop. 

You'll be assessed with unseen and open-book exams, essays, practical reports, individual and group projects, oral and visual presentations, case study analysis, and problem-solving exercises. We also use blogs, online portfolios and web page design, to help you develop sought-after e-communication skills.

See our full glossary of assessment terms.

Features

Fieldwork

Spend part of your time working in the field and getting to know the spectacular landscapes around Bristol. There are optional field trips to Cornwall, and the chance to go on expedition to Cuba, or to the threatened forests of Madagascar, where you'll study human-wildlife interactions.

You'll investigate a range of natural and semi-natural habitats, and develop the practical skills to study wildlife and conservation science in the field.

Find out about a field trip in Cornwall from our students studying Marine Ecosystems, and read about a recent field trip to a tropical island near Cuba to study the ecosystem.

Study facilities

The course is part-delivered at Bristol Zoo, so you'll be surrounded by wildlife and wildlife experts, working in the zoo's new Education Centre, and at their second site Wild Place. With access to well-equipped science laboratories, a glasshouse and a dedicated field centre at the University, you'll be supported and mentored by a team of specialists at the forefront of their profession.

You'll get to use extensive equipment for fieldwork and field-based laboratory work at our field centres.

Learn more about UWE Bristol's facilities and resources.

Careers

Careers / Further study

By the end of the course, you'll be well prepared to work with national and international conservation organisations, or ecological consultants such as Wildlife Trusts, The Woodland Trust and other non-government organisations (NGOs).

Practical experience in plant and animal survey work, competency at mapping (GIS), and knowledge of monitoring protected species such as great crested newts, reptiles, bats, badgers or water voles are especially valuable in finding rewarding jobs. If you're interested in conservation education, there are opportunities with the Field Studies Council and other educational organisations. There are also many options for postgraduate study and research degrees. You could specialise in an area such as wildlife filmmaking, science communication or environmental consultancy.

Be inspired

Our award-winning careers service will develop your employment potential through career coaching and help you to find graduate jobs, placements and global opportunities. We can also help find local volunteering and community opportunities, provide support for entrepreneurial activity and get you access to employer events.

Visit our employability pages to learn more about careers, employers and what our students are doing six months after graduating.

Fees

Full time course

FeesAmount (£)
Home/EU-Full Time-Annual (Per Year) Fee9250
Home/EU-Full Time-Module Fee (15 Credit)1156
International-Full Time-Annual (Per Year) Fee13500
International-Full Time-Module Fee (15 Credit)1688

Indicative Additional Costs

FeesAmount (£)
Additional Course Costs - Full Time - Home/EU - Indicative Maximum Cost Per year482

Part time course

FeesAmount (£)
Home/EU-Part Time-Module Fee (15 Credit)1156

Supplementary fee information

Additional costs are for items you could need during your studies that aren't covered by the standard tuition fee. These could be materials, textbooks, travel, clothing, software or printing.

Learn more about costs.

Entry

Entry requirements

  • English Language Requirement:

    If English is not your first language, you will need to meet the UK Border Agency's and the University's minimum English language requirements such as the International English Language Test (IELTS) overall overall score of 6.5 with no component below 5.5 or overall score of 6.0 with no more than one component at 5.5.

  • GCSE subjects: Grade C/4 in English Literature or Language and Mathematics, or equivalent. We do not accept Level 2 Key Skills, Functional Skills or Certificates in Adult Numeracy and Literacy as alternatives to GCSEs.

    You should normally hold an HND or Foundation Degree (or equivalent), or have successfully completed the equivalent of 240 UK credit points (120 ECTS credits) in a related subject discipline.

    International applicants

    For country specific entry requirements please find your country on the Country Information pages.

    If you are applying to study at UWE Bristol and require additional support to meet our English language requirements, you may be able to attend one of our pre-sessional English courses. Read more about our Pre-Sessional English Programme.

    Read more about entry requirements.

    For further information

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